Sept. 8: This is an auspicious date, the birthday of both Patsy Cline (1932) and Harlan Howard (1927). It calls for hearing one more time their most successful collaboration, “I Fall to Pieces.”
Howard, the “dean of Nashville songwriters,” along with legendary fellow tunesmith Hank Cochran, wrote the song based on a title idea of Cochran’s. But they were having trouble placing it with a singer. Brenda Lee thought it was too country for her. Roy Drusky said it was a woman’s song and wouldn’t cut it. Cline overheard his rejection and said I’ll record it. It became her first No. 1 country hit, and reached No. 12 on the pop charts.
It’s another song that the listener recognizes instantly from the first notes, provided by guitar maestro Hank Garland. Other signatures are Bob Moore’s walking bass,the Jordanaires’ silky harmonies and, of course, Cline’s wonderfully expressive singing. Not only is it a great song, it’s a great record.
To learn more
Click to listen

Click to listen

Sept. 8: This is an auspicious date, the birthday of both Patsy Cline (1932) and Harlan Howard (1927). It calls for hearing one more time their most successful collaboration, “I Fall to Pieces.”

Howard, the “dean of Nashville songwriters,” along with legendary fellow tunesmith Hank Cochran, wrote the song based on a title idea of Cochran’s. But they were having trouble placing it with a singer. Brenda Lee thought it was too country for her. Roy Drusky said it was a woman’s song and wouldn’t cut it. Cline overheard his rejection and offered to record it. It became her first No. 1 country hit, also reaching No. 12 on the pop charts.

Harlan Howard

Harlan Howard

It’s another song that the listener recognizes instantly from the first notes, provided by guitar maestro Hank Garland. Other signatures are Bob Moore’s walking bass,the Jordanaires’ silky harmonies and, of course, Cline’s wonderfully expressive singing. Not only is it a great song, it’s a great record.

To learn more:

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